Wednesday, April 4, 2012

USS Akron

Akron's maiden voyage on November 2, 1931, showing four starboard propellers. The engines' water reclaiming devices appear as white strips above each propeller. The emergency rear control cabin is visible in the lower fin
USS Akron (ZRS-4) was a helium-filled rigid airship of the United States Navy that was lost in a weather-related accident off the New Jersey coast early on April 4, 1933, killing 73 of the 76 crew and passengers on board. During its accident-prone 18-month term of service, she also served as a flying aircraft carrier for launching F9C Sparrowhawk biplane fighters.
At 785 ft (239 m) long, 20 ft (6.1 m) shorter than the German commercial airship Hindenburg, Akron and her sister Macon were among the largest flying objects in the world. Although the Hindenburg was longer, it was filled with hydrogen, so the two U.S. airships still hold the world record for helium-filled airships.

“Fixed the cornice on the barn this forenoon.  Painted the end over this afternoon.  Very windy this afternoon.”
Leesah

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